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The Co-op brand has been used by various companies, associations or groups, and simply can signify any cooperative or group(s) that cooperate with its member-owners. The members each own shares or parts of the cooperative, which can give them voting rights towards the Co-ops activities, business, investments, etc... These shares can often be bought or sold, and the members can be individuals, other smaller co-ops, or privately-owned businesses.

Co-ops exist, or have existed, for agriculture, groceries, dry-goods/general merchandise, hardware, electric providers, etc...

Co-op Tractors/EquipmentEdit

There have been a couple of co-ops that marketed tractors and farm equipment under the Co-op brand.

National Farm Machinery Co-Operative (NFMC)
Successor Cockshutt
Founded 1940
Defunct 1952
Headquarters Bellevue, Ohio, USA
Number of locations Shelbyville, Indiana, USA (tractors)
Products agriculture machinery tractor
Farmer's Union Co-op
Headquarters St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
Products agriculture machinery tractor

Probably the first Co-op tractors appeared in 1934 when Huber built some for a farmer co-op. There doesn't seem to be much record of these.[1]

National Farm Machinery Co-OperativeEdit

NFMC Co-op plants b&w - 1951

National Farm Machinery Co-Operative (NFMC) was a agricultural co-op based in Bellevue, Ohio, USA founded in 1942 by 13 regional co-ops. They developed and had tractors produced under the Co-op brand in Shelbyville, Indiana, USA in their own manufacturing facilities. Some of the tractors marketed by NFMC are identical to those by Farmer's Union Co-op, both sets being produced by Duplex Machinery Corp and its predecessors. Other tractors were built by Cockshutt in Canada and Cletrac in Cleveland, Ohio, USA.[2]

The Corn Belt Machinery Company of Waterloo, Iowa was moved to Shelbyville, Indiana, and the Ohio Cultivator Company of Bellevue, Ohio, which was most famous for the Black Hawk corn planter and the Thomas grain drill, were purchased by NFMC to manufacture equipment. Custom Manufacturing Corp was set up in Shelbyville, Indiana in 1944 by three principals of NFMC, including the Indiana Farm Bureau Co-op.[3][4]

Co-op E7 pull-type combine brochure (CCIL)

Co-op E7 pull-type combine harvester

An agreement was signed with Cockshutt for the supply of tractors and combine harvesters, while NFMC supplied implements to Cockshutt from its plants.[5] Some of the pull-type combines were produced in Canada by Co-op Implements, or CCIL.

In 1952, NFMC sold out to Cockshutt, as Cockshutt wanted access to the dealer network that Co-op had. Production plants in Bellevue, Ohio were included in the sale.


Farmer's Union Co-opEdit

Farmer's Union Co-op was based in St. Paul, Minnesota, USA, and marketed tractors built in Battlefield, Michigan, USA, first by the Duplex Machinery Company, then by Co-operative Manufacturing Company, and finally by Arthurdale Manufacturing Company of Arthurdale, West Virginia. Duplex began manufacturing the Co-op No.1 and Farmer's Union Co-op No. 1 in 1937. By 1938, the company's name had changed to the Co-operative Manufacturing Company and the No. 2 and No. 3 models were offered. By 1940, Arthurdale was listed as the manufacturer.[6] According to the USDA, the Arthurdale plant was provided by the Farm Security Administration and operated by the American Cooperatives, Inc. [7]


Farm Bureau Co-opsEdit

Ohio Farm Bureau Co-op and Indiana Farm Bureau Co-op started selling the Co-op G in 1939 and 1941, built by Cletrac (the Cletrac General GG). It was later sold as the Co-op B1.[8] The Indiana group was then instrumental in setting up Custom Manufacturing Corp in 1944.

ModelsEdit

MM Air Force IN State Fair 8-9-1997

Co-op Plow at Mid-America Threshing Show

TractorsEdit

Co-op/Farmer's Union Co-op Tractor Models
Model Year(s) Produced Horsepower Engine Type Misc Notes Photo
Co-op No. 1 1937-1938 Waukesha built in USA by Duplex Machinery Co-op No. 1 (Duplex)
Co-op No. 2 1936-? 36 hp (27 kW) Chrysler built in USA by Duplex Machinery Co-op No. 2 (Duplex) - 1950
Co-op No. 3 1936-1950 42 hp (31 kW) Chrysler built in USA by Duplex Machinery Co-op No.3 (Duplex) brochure
Co-op B 1941-1942 19 hp (14 kW) Hercules built in USA by Cletrac
same as Cletrac GG
Co-op B
Co-op B2 1939-1941 Chrysler built in Shelbyville, Indiana, USA
by Custom
Co-op B2 Jr. 33 hp (25 kW) Continental built in Shelbyville, Indiana, USA
by Custom
Co-op B3 Chrysler built in Shelbyville, Indiana, USA
by Custom
Co-op C 1944 Continental built in Shelbyville, Indiana, USA
by Custom
Co-op C 2
Co-op D3 1945 Chrysler built in Shelbyville, Indiana, USA
by Custom
Co-op E2 1952-1953 30 hp (22 kW) Continental built in Canada by Cockshutt
a Cockshutt 20
Co-op E3 28 hp (21 kW) Buda built in Canada by Cockshutt
a Cockshutt 30
Co-op E3 (Medium)
Co-op E4 1949-1958 43 hp (32 kW) Buda built in Canada by Cockshutt
a Cockshutt 40
Harvard-Milk Days Co-Op tractor1
Co-op E4 LPG 43 hp (32 kW) Buda built in Canada by Cockshutt
a Cockshutt 40
Co-op E5 built in Canada by Cockshutt
a Cockshutt 50
Co-op E-5
Co-op G 1939-1941 19 hp (14 kW) Hercules built in USA by Cletrac
same as Cletrac GG
Co-op (Huber) 1934-? built by Huber Co-op (by Huber)
Farmer's Union Co-op No. 1 1937-1938 Waukesha built in USA by Duplex Machinery Farmer's Union Co-op No. 1
Farmer's Union Co-op No. 2 1936-? Chrysler built in USA by Duplex Machinery Farmer's Union Co-op No. 2
Farmer's Union Co-op No. 3 1936-1950 36 hp (27 kW) Chrysler built in USA by Duplex Machinery Farmer's Union Co-op No.3 - 1936
Farmer's Union Co-op No. 3S 1948-1950 42 hp (31 kW) Chrysler built in USA by Duplex Machinery

HarvestersEdit

Co-op Harvester Models
Model Year(s) Produced Horsepower Engine Type Misc Notes Photo
Co-op 950 combine built in Sweden by BM Volvo
Co-op 951 combine built in Sweden by BM Volvo
Co-op 960 combine
Co-op 9600 combine
Co-op E112 combine Chrysler built in Canada by Cockshutt
marketed by National Farm Machinery Co-Operative
Co-op Harvester combine brochure - 1950
Co-op E115 combine Chrysler built in Canada by Cockshutt marketed by National Farm Machinery Co-Operative Co-op Harvester combine brochure - 1950


See AlsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


External LinksEdit